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September 2011 Sales Numbers

Another month of sales passes. While September, in some respects appeared slow, it was steady. I can attribute part of this to finally getting sales reports in from Apple, Diesel, and Kobo. While Apple & Diesel contributed one sale each for The Present, Kobo accounted for eight free sales of Copy Bird.

Speaking of Copy Bird, all is not as bad as it seems. On September 19th, Amazon bumped the price of the eBook back up to $0.99 US. I thought that was the end of watching the fun, as in one and a half months Copy Bird sold 4,800 copies. But I was wrong. Now that it got into Amazon's system and filtered through their algorithms, Copy Bird has consistently sold around two copies every day. This is good news because they are paying consumers, which means, if they like my work, they might search out more. Let's hope so!

I also released a new book, although the content isn't new besides its introduction. In eBook and print format you can now get all the stories that make up Book 1 of Miscorrection. It is entitled Miscorrection: Book 1 (Sunrise to Sundown). While there aren't any sales of it yet, I expect I'll see them over time.

Overall, this month expands on August, which had 22 sales. The growth comes in at around 50%, which is great! I doubt I can keep that pace, but if I do that would be awesome.

A special thanks to all the paying readers of my books. I greatly appreciate your support!

Here are my paid book sales for September 2011:

Total Paid Sales: 37

This month, I'm trying something different. I want to see what no marketing does. I'll still post things on my blog, but I will not advertise links to buy my books on Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. It might be a mistake, but it will be an interesting experiment. Until next month... What a dumb idea! What was I thinking?

Comments

  1. Thanks for a really interesting strategy: getting 4,800 copies (readers) of Copybird into circulation via a free sale on Amazon, which then generated actual sales at $.99! I wonder if you plan to try this strategy with some of your other books?

    I'm guessing that nearly all your sales come through Amazon? Have you had any sales through iBooks?

    It would also be interesting to see the numbers for free sales on platforms like Smashwords.

    Have you considered using an e-publisher that charges for their services, such as Lulu?

    Keep going. I find your approach to e-publishing fascinating and informative.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm debating whether or not I will do this with other books. Most likely not.

    Yes, most of my sales come through Amazon with a handful from B&N and 1 each from iBooks and Diesel. Over time, I'm hoping this grows. But I do know that Amazon will be the leader for the foreseeable future.

    ReplyDelete

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